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GOOGL

Alphabet Inc. Nasdaq Global Select
$2,275.99
Open: $2,279 High: $2,304.09 Low: $2,257.12 Close: $2,271.2
Range: 2021-04-19 - 2021-04-20
Volume: 2,326,241
Market: Extended-hours
Powered by Finage Stock APIDelayed data
GOOGL
Alphabet Inc. 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway Mountain View CA, 94043 https://www.abc.xyz
Alphabet Inc is a provider of internet content products and portals. Its suite of brands includes Search, Android, YouTube, Apps, Maps & Ads.
  • CEO: Larry Page
  • Employees: 94,372
  • Sector: Technology
  • Industry: Online Media
GOOGL News
Latest news about the GOOGL
  • 'Click to dial' ads tricking customers on Google, Which? warns

    The group analysed search results for the terms people most commonly use when searching for their car insurer’s phone number on Google, the default search engine on Android phones and Apple iPhones.

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  • Alphabet (GOOGL) Stock Moves -0.47%: What You Should Know

    In the latest trading session, Alphabet (GOOGL) closed at $2,279.01, marking a -0.47% move from the previous day.

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  • Will Big-Tech Drive Indices to Record Highs in Q2?

    The last year has been a volatile one for investors to say the least. Several indices fell off a cliff in March 2020 as the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in economic shutdowns, rising unemployment rates, and lower consumer spending. Several sectors including retail, energy, hospitality, airline, and restaurants were decimated. However, the pandemic also acted as a tailwind for companies in the technology sector as the demand for e-commerce, cloud computing, social media, and gaming soared. Trillion-dollar giant stocks including Apple Inc (NASDAQ: AAPL), Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ: MSFT), Amazon.com, Inc (NASDAQ: AMZN), and Alphabet Inc. (NASDAQ: GOOGL) gained solid momentum in 2020 and pushed the S&P 500 to record highs. While the markets continue to remain volatile in 2021 due to concerns surrounding valuation, multiple COVID-19 strains, and rising interest rates, investors are also buoyed about the fast rollout of vaccinations at least in the U.S. The upcoming earnings seasons remain critical for investors. The Q1 results and specifically earnings of companies part of the high-growth tech space are expected to drive markets in 2021. After four consecutive quarters of earnings decline, the S&P 500 is forecast to report year over year earnings growth of 24.5% in the March quarter according to a FactSet report. Let’s take a look at what this earnings season has in store for big-tech companies. Apple Apple accounts for 6% of the S&P 500 and is currently valued at a market cap of $2.23 trillion. The consumer technology giant is a market leader in several verticals and has successfully created an eco-system that ensures customer loyalty and repeat purchases. It now has multiple subscription businesses that include the Apple TV+, Apple. Arcade, Apple Care, and Apple Music. It is one of the largest smartphone manufacturers and leads the high-growth wearable segment as well. Apple Services is the company’s second-largest business segment which suggests Apple is no longer dependent on hardware sales to drive top-line growth. In the March quarter, Wall Street expects Apple to report sales of $77 billion, indicating year-over-year growth of 32%. Comparatively, its earnings are forecast to rise by 53% to $0.98 in Q1. Microsoft The second-largest holding of the S&P 500, Microsoft accounts for 5.44% of the index. In the last decade, Microsoft has successfully transformed itself from a software company to one of the largest players in the cloud computing space. Microsoft Azure is in fact the second-largest public cloud platform in the world after Amazon Web Services. The company’s commercial cloud sales that include Office 365, Azure, Dynamics 365, and others accounted for close to 40% of total sales and grew by a robust 34% year over year in the last quarter. These subscription-based products will allow Microsoft to generate steady cash flows across business cycles. In the March quarter, analysts expect the company to post revenue of $41 billion which is 17.3% higher than its prior-year period. Comparatively, earnings are forecast to rise by 26.4% as well to $1.77. Amazon While Amazon is synonymous with e-commerce, it is also the largest public cloud player in the world. Further, it's the third-largest digital advertising company after Alphabet’s Google and Facebook. According to a report from eMarketer, Amazon’s market share in the digital ad space stands at 10.3%. Valued at a market cap of $1.7 trillion, Amazon accounts for 4.08% of the S&P 500. In Q4, the company’s e-commerce sales were up 40% year over year and this figure stood at 28% for 2020. International sales soared 57% indicating Amazon is gaining traction in other e-commerce markets too. The company’s e-commerce revenue accounts for approximately 33% of online retail sales in the U.S. While the online retail business is Amazon’s cash cow, its cloud segment is raking in the profits. In Q4, cloud computing revenue soared 27% reporting over $3.5 billion in operating profit. In the March quarter, analysts expect Amazon to post revenue of $104.4 billion which is 38.4% higher than its prior-year period. Comparatively, earnings are forecast to rise by 89% as well to $9.47. Alphabet The fourth-largest holding in the S&P 500 is Alphabet that accounts for 3.71% of the index. Alphabet is the parent company of Google which is the largest search engine in the world. In the June quarter of 2020, Alphabet’s revenue declined year over year for the first time ever as enterprise ad-spending was cut significantly due to the pandemic-driven recession. However, in the December quarter, ad sales roared back to life and were up 22% year over year. Google’s Cloud business grew by a stellar 47% in Q4 and is steadily gaining market share from leaders Amazon and Microsoft. In fact, Google Cloud sales have risen from $5.83 billion in 2018 to $13.06 billion in 2020. The public cloud market is valued at $236 billion giving Alphabet enough opportunities to grow its top-line in 2021 and beyond. Wall Street expects Alphabet to increase sales by 24.7% to $51.3 billion in Q1 while earnings are forecast to grow by 60% to $15.8. Facebook Facebook accounts for less than 2% of the S&P 500 and is the index’s fifth-largest holding. It is the largest social media company in the world and it drew 3.3 billion people to its platforms if you include WhatsApp and Instagram. That’s over 40% of the total world population. This allowed Facebook to increase ad-sales by 21% year over year in 2020. Right now, it is yet to monetize messaging platforms such as Messenger and WhatsApp, making it one of the top stocks in the world. In Q1, analysts expect Facebook sales to rise by 32.6% to $23.5 billion while earnings are forecast to grow by 38% to $2.36. The final takeaway The five tech behemoths mentioned above account for almost 20% of the S&P 500. While these companies have experienced an impressive rally despite the pandemic, the upcoming quarterly results and management guidance will decide the course of equity markets in 2021. See more from BenzingaClick here for options trades from BenzingaIs This the Future of Cryptocurrency Trading?Top NFT Marketplaces For 2021© 2021 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

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  • Daily Mail Owner Sues Google For Antitrust Practices Over Down Ranking UK Royal Family Coverage: WSJ

    The Daily Mail’s owner has filed an antitrust lawsuit against Alphabet Inc’s (NASDAQ: GOOG) (NASDAQ: GOOGL) Google for abusing its market power by linking its search engine and ad-sales platform to pressurize publishers, the Wall Street Journal reports. The suit was filed by the Daily mail’s owner, Associated Newspapers, along with its U.S. unit called Mail Media in the Manhattan federal court. Daily Mail alleged that Google penalizes publishers in search rankings if they failed to sell enough advertising space through Google’s marketplace. Google’s alleged downranking of the Daily Mail’s 2021 U.K. royal family coverage in Google’s search results triggered the lawsuit. According to a Texas lawsuit, Google’s “Project Bernanke” has allowed it to understand the competitor’s bidding behavior. Google has acknowledged the program but refuted the allegations. The Daily Mail’s suit also alleged that Google’s phase-out of cookies in its Chrome web browser would increase advertisers’ difficulty to target ads. Google has refuted the allegations in the suit, citing there is no correlation of ad tech tools on publisher website ranking in Google Search. Google said it competes in a crowded and competitive ad tech space where publishers could exercise multiple options. In January, West Virginia’s Charleston Gazette-Mail parent company slapped an antitrust suit against Google and Facebook Inc (NASDAQ: FB). Several other small publishers brought lawsuits against the tech companies over the “Jedi Blue” deal. The U.S. Justice Department and attorney general in several states also filed antitrust lawsuits on Google. Google has denied its market power abuse allegations citing the competitiveness of the ad technology market. The U.K.-based Daily Mail sought undetermined damages and sought transparency into Google’s news-search algorithm. Google’s search engine is a significant web traffic source for many sites. However, Google also competed with publishers for online ad dollars and supplied tools to ad buyers. Google owns a 29% share of the U.S. digital ad market in 2020, based on eMarketer. Price action: GOOG shares traded lower by 0.65% at $2,287.53 on the last check Tuesday. See more from BenzingaClick here for options trades from BenzingaGoogle, Apple To Testify At Senate's Antitrust Hearing With Spotify, Tile, Match As WitnessesFacebook Oversight Board Seeks Additional Time For Trump Ban Decision© 2021 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

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  • Were Hedge Funds Right About Betting On Alphabet Inc (GOOGL)?

    Our extensive research has shown that imitating the smart money can generate significant returns for retail investors, which is why we track nearly 900 active prominent money managers and analyze their quarterly 13F filings. The stocks that are heavily bought by hedge funds historically outperformed the market, though there is no shortage of high profile […]

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  • Apple debuts iPad Pro with high-powered M1 chip, high-end display

    Apple has debuted its first iPad Pro with the company's M1 chip.

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  • Daily Mail owner accuses Google of hiding Royals coverage as it files lawsuit

    The owner of the Daily Mail is suing Google for running an alleged advertising monopoly, accusing the technology giant of manipulating search engine results depending on how much advertising a publisher sends its way. It accused Google of “illegally building its dominance in the ad tech industry by harming rivals, bid-rigging on ad auctions and manipulating news search results” in what has become a £90bn industry, according to the antitrust lawsuit filed by Associated Newspapers in a Manhattan court on Tuesday. Google caused the Daily Mail's website to “disappear” on its search results overnight in June 2019 before reinstating it overnight three months later, according to the lawsuit. It claims that in between that time, Google "forced" the publisher to sell twice as much advertising space through its own exchange, which the publisher received less money for compared to its competitors. Executives grew suspicious again this year when the website's Royals, Piers Morgan and Prince Philip coverage failed to show up prominently in the search engine. When searching for “Harry and Meghan” on Google between March 1 and March 11, the Mail's website had only 1.65pc of overall visibility on the search engine, compared to the BBC's 16.62pc, it said. Its visibility share for the keywords “Piers Morgan” had just 1.57pc yet the Independent and the Guardian held 13.7pc and 11.8pc, it said. Again, the keyword “Prince Phillip” had 1.34pc visibility share on Google, compared to the BBC's 17pc. It is the latest in a series of lawsuits for Google as Competition watchdogs around the world including the UK’s Competition and Markets Authority and the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission scrutinise its advertising technology. The US Justice Department and attorneys general of several states have also accused the technology company of wilfully crushing competition and running a monopoly - allegations that Google denies. A Google spokesman said the claims were “completely inaccurate” and that that “the use of our ad tech tools has no bearing on how a publisher’s website ranks in Google Search”. “More generally, we compete in a crowded and competitive ad tech space where publishers have and exercise multiple options. The Daily Mail itself authorises dozens of ad tech companies to sell and manage their ad space, including Amazon, Verizon and more,” they added. Associated Newspapers is asking a judge for compensation and to block Google from forcing the tying of its products. It has also asked a judge to ensure the company must make it clear if it changes its search algorithm, which could minimise some news websites, and eliminate “bias in its search results”.

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  • Daily Mail owner sues Google for monopoly over ad business

    The Daily Mail, owner of the MailOnline newspaper, sued Google on Tuesday, alleging that the search and advertising giant's power over selling online ad space means newspapers see little of the revenue their content produces. The federal lawsuit against Google and its parent, Alphabet Inc, alleges that Google controls the tools used to sell ad inventory as well as the space on publishers' pages where ads can be placed and the exchange that decides where ads will be placed. "The lack of competition for publishers’ inventory depresses prices and reduces the amount and quality of news available to readers, but Google ends up ahead because it controls a growing share of the ad space that remains," the lawsuit said.

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  • UPDATE 1-Daily Mail owner sues Google for monopoly over ad business

    The Daily Mail, owner of the MailOnline newspaper, sued Google on Tuesday, alleging that the search and advertising giant's power over selling online ad space means newspapers see little of the revenue their content produces. The federal lawsuit against Google and its parent, Alphabet Inc, alleges that Google controls the tools used to sell ad inventory as well as the space on publishers' pages where ads can be placed and the exchange that decides where ads will be placed. "The lack of competition for publishers’ inventory depresses prices and reduces the amount and quality of news available to readers, but Google ends up ahead because it controls a growing share of the ad space that remains," the lawsuit said.

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  • These Are The Best Robinhood Stocks To Buy Or Watch Now

    Buying a stock is easy, but purchasing the right stock without a proven strategy is incredibly hard. Here are the best Robinhood stocks to buy now.

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  • Daily Mail files antitrust lawsuit against Google

    The owner of the online newspaper MailOnline, which is known in the United States as the "Daily Mail," filed a lawsuit against Google on Tuesday, alleging that the search and advertising giant's power over selling online ad space means that newspapers see little of the revenue that their content produces. The lawsuit alleges that Google controls the tools used to sell ad inventory as well as the space on publishers' pages where ads can be placed and the exchange that decides where ads will be placed. "The lack of competition for publishers’ inventory depresses prices and reduces the amount and quality of news available to readers, but Google ends up ahead because it controls a growing share of the ad space that remains," the lawsuit said.

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  • Google, Apple To Testify At Senate's Antitrust Hearing With Spotify, Tile, Match As Witnesses

    A policy executive will represent Alphabet Inc’s (NASDAQ; GOOGL) (NASDAQ: GOOG) Google on Wednesday’s Senate app store antitrust hearing, Bloomberg reports. Senior Director of Government Affairs and Public Policy Wilson White will represent Google. Chief Compliance Officer Kyle Andeer will represent Apple. Horacio Gutierrez, Kirsten Daru, and Jared Sine will represent Spotify Technology SA (NYSE: SPOT), Tile, and Match Group Inc’s (NASDAQ: MTCH), respectively, as witnesses in the hearing. Consumer Federation of America, director of research, Mark Cooper, will also be a part of the hearing. Spotify and Match had lodged allegations against Apple Inc (NASDAQ: AAPL) and Google’s App Store rules and fees, Reuters reports. Tile suspected undue advantage from Apple’s Find My app to its rumored AirTags accessory for finding physical objects. The Senate subcommittee was inspecting Apple and Google over anti-competitive practices and concerns from app developers. Google justified its difference with Apple, emphasizing Android device owners’ discretion to download alternative app stores. However, Google required device manufacturers to install its app store and other mobile services, thereby offering its properties a competitive advantage. Democrat Senator Amy Klobuchar and Republican Senator Mike Lee represented the Senate subcommittee. Apple initially declined to participate based on the Senators. The Senators mailed to Apple CEO demanding a witness. The letter emphasized Apple’s influencing power on the cost, supply, and availability of mobile applications on Apple devices leading to grave anti-competitive issues. All of which necessitated Apple’s participation. The Justice Department’s antitrust division has been examining Apple’s App Store over suspected anti-competitive practices. Apple’s ongoing antitrust lawsuit with Epic Games Inc will go to trial in early May. Apple recently announced Parler social network app’s return to the App Store. App makers had long alleged anti-competitive practices through Apple’s App Store’s mandatory revenue sharing payments and strict inclusion rules for iPhones and iPads, along with Google’s Play store for Android devices. See more from BenzingaClick here for options trades from BenzingaWhat Is Expected From Apple's Spring Event Today?Hyundai Appoints Apple, Microsoft Veteran To Lead New Mobility Division: Reuters© 2021 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

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  • Why Coinbase Could Be the Google of Cryptocurrencies

    The crypto exchange looks a lot like Alphabet did at the time of its IPO. Will it be for crypto what Google is for search?

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  • What Are FANG Stocks, And Should You Invest In Them?

    The acronym FANG refers to four high-growth internet stocks. (Sometimes they're called FAANG stocks.) Here's what investors should know about FANG stocks and why they might be worth a look.

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  • 8 best wireless printers to upgrade your home office set-up

    Although most devices now have the technology, not all of them are equal. We've found the top performers in our round-up

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  • Morning Bell With Jim Cramer: Don't Buy the Dip in Peloton

    Jim Cramer shares stock-market news including Peloton's safety issues, breakup chatter about Alphabet and a look back at the earnings season so far.

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  • Daily Mail publisher launches lawsuit against Google

    The publisher of the Daily Mail has filed an antitrust complaint against Google and its parent Alphabet in the US over its advertising and search activities, dealing a setback to the tech company’s efforts to end its long-running war with news publishers. The lawsuit filed by Associated Newspapers and Mail Media in the Southern District of New York seeks damages and injunctive relief against the tech giant for what it alleges is a “de facto bid-rigging scheme” and search bias on Google. It comes a month after a new media law in Australia led Google to forge a global content deal with News Corp, which had long been its biggest antagonist.

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  • UK, German and Australian regulators unify against Big Tech

    Antitrust regulators in the UK, Germany and Australia mounted a unified attack against the domination of internet giants on Tuesday, in a warning that the pandemic was not an excuse to approve deals. The three regulators, which have been at the forefront of global attempts to rein in big tech companies such as Facebook and Google, said the pandemic had accelerated the concentration of power in the hands of a few, and warned they would take an increasingly sceptical view of tie-ups.

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  • Apple to Reinstate Parler; Google Offers Potential Return

    (Bloomberg) -- Apple Inc. will let the social-media app Parler back on the App Store after an almost four-month absence, the iPhone maker told U.S. lawmakers ahead of a congressional antitrust hearing later this week.The Cupertino, California-based technology giant made the disclosure in a letter to Senator Mike Lee, a Republican from Utah, and Representative Ken Buck, a Republican from Colorado. The social media app, a favorite of conservatives who have left Twitter Inc., was removed from the App Store in January after it was one of the online networks used to incite violence at the Capitol in Washington. At the time, Apple said it pulled the app for violating content guidelines and said it would consider reinstating the service if Parler made changes to better moderate content.On Monday, Alphabet Inc.’s Google also indicated it would allow Parler back on the Google Play store if the app meets guidelines. “Parler is welcome back in the Play store once it submits an app that complies with our policies,” a Google spokesperson said. The company added that the app had remained available on Android via other channels despite the January removal from Google Play.Apple told the government officials in its letter that it found posts on Parler that “encouraged violence, denigrated various ethnic groups, races and religions, glorified Nazism, and called for violence.” Since the initial rejection, as well as rejections of other updates, Apple has “engaged in substantial conversations with Parler in an effort to bring the Parler app into compliance with the guidelines and reinstate it in the App Store,” the company said in the letter.Read more: Apple Blocks Parler Return to App Store on Offensive ContentApple said Parler has proposed content moderation changes and was informed on April 14 that an update of the app would be approved. Parler said in a statement that it would launch the updated app next week on the App Store.The reinstatement to the App Store “comes after several months of productive dialogue with Apple and new information that Parler provided to the public and Congress to demonstrate that the company has always prohibited incitement and Parler had been unfairly scapegoated for the events of January 6th,” the social network said in a statement. Parler said it “implemented several new safeguards in order to detect posts that would not fall within the protections of the First Amendment.” The social network, however, said it won’t “make changes to its broad policies to create a free and open platform without viewpoint censorship and committed to the First Amendment rights of its users.” That will mean that the iPhone version of the Parler app will exclude posts that will otherwise remain available on Parler’s web and Android versions.In its letter, Apple said it requires apps to filter “objectionable material,” provide a way for users to report offensive content, offer the ability to block “abusive users” and list contact information so users can reach the developer. Google requires similar moderation tools for apps hosted on Google Play.In Apple’s letter on Monday to the lawmakers, written by Senior Director of Government Affairs for the Americas Timothy Powderly, the company said it originally decided to remove Parler independently and that it did not coordinate with Google or Amazon.com Inc, which barred Parler from running on its cloud service.Apple’s decision to reinstate Parler comes ahead of a Wednesday hearing scheduled by the Senate Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Competition Policy, Antitrust and Consumer Rights, which is run by Senator Amy Klobuchar, a Democrat from Minnesota. Lee is the panel’s top Republican. Kyle Andeer, Apple’s chief compliance officer, will speak at the hearing, the company said earlier this month.“Apple’s power over the cost, distribution, and availability of mobile applications on the Apple devices used by millions of consumers raises serious competition issues that are of interest to the subcommittee, consumers, and app developers,” the senators wrote to Apple Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook ahead of the hearing. “A full and fair examination of these issues before the subcommittee requires Apple’s participation.”(Updates with comments from Parler on app release timing and details beginning in the fifth paragraph.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2021 Bloomberg L.P.

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  • Senate to Call Spotify, Match at Apple, Google Antitrust Hearing

    (Bloomberg) -- Google will send a top policy executive to testify at Wednesday’s Senate app store antitrust hearing, while legal executives from Spotify Technology SA, Tile and Match Group Inc. will serve as witnesses, according to people with knowledge of the matter.Google Senior Director of Government Affairs and Public Policy Wilson White will be the search giant’s representative, joining Apple Chief Compliance Officer Kyle Andeer in the spotlight. The Senate Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Competition Policy, Antitrust and Consumer Rights, which is holding the hearing, also plans to call Horacio Gutierrez, Kirsten Daru, and Jared Sine, top legal executives from Spotify, Tile and Match Group, respectively.Mark Cooper, director of research for the Consumer Federation of America, will also be called. Spotify, Tile and Match have all been embroiled in antitrust fights with Apple recently, with Spotify and Match filing complaints about Apple’s App Store rules and fees. Tile believes Apple’s Find My app will give the company’s rumored AirTags accessory for finding physical objects a leg up over third-party rivals.Read more: Apple Makes Top Executive Available at Senate App Store HearingThe Senate subcommittee is investigating Apple and Google over competition issues and concerns from app developers. Apple’s Andeer previously testified on several matters for Apple before the House of Representatives and other U.S. lawmakers.White, a top deputy of Google legal chief Kent Walker, joined the company in 2011 after working as a software developer and patent lawyer. Since 2013, he has worked as a policy director on Google’s ads and apps divisions, units that were critical to Google’s business success with mobile phones. They’re also units that have been at the center of some of Google’s political troubles.On the app store issue, Google often argues that it differs from Apple since Android device owners are free to download alternative app stores, like those from Samsung and wireless carriers. But Google does require device manufacturers to install its app store and other mobile services, giving its properties a competitive advantage. That arrangement was the centerpiece of a European Union antitrust case against Google. The company disputed the EU charges.The subcommittee is run by Senator Amy Klobuchar, a Democrat from Minnesota, and Senator Mike Lee is the panel’s top Republican. The two lawmakers said Apple initially declined to participate, and they sent a letter to Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook to demand that the company send a witness.“Apple’s power over the cost, distribution, and availability of mobile applications on the Apple devices used by millions of consumers raises serious competition issues that are of interest to the subcommittee, consumers, and app developers,” the letter said. “A full and fair examination of these issues before the subcommittee requires Apple’s participation.”The Justice Department’s antitrust division has been investigating Apple’s App Store practices to determine whether the company is harming competition, Bloomberg has reported. Apple is embroiled in an antitrust lawsuit with Epic Games Inc., which goes to trial in early May. Earlier on Monday, Apple said it would allow the Parler social network app to return to the App Store, potentially easing some of the expected questioning on Wednesday.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2021 Bloomberg L.P.

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