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SNY

Sanofi American Depositary Shares (Each repstg one-half of one) New York Stock Exchange
$49.75
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SNY
Sanofi American Depositary Shares (Each repstg one-half of one) 54, Rue La Boétie Paris , 75008 http://www.sanofi.com
Sanofi SA is healthcare company which is engaged in the research, development, manufacture and marketing of therapeutic solutions. It business activities include operations of specialty care, Established Prescription Products and vaccines operations.
  • CEO: Olivier Brandicourt
  • Employees: 106,566
  • Sector: Healthcare
  • Industry: Drug Manufacturers
SNY News
Latest news about the SNY
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  • Sanofi Spins Off an Industry-Leading Business

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  • SANOFI unveils EUROAPI as the name of the new industry leading European API* company and appoints Karl Rotthier as its future Chief Executive Officer

    SANOFI unveils EUROAPI as the name of the new industry leading European API* company and appoints Karl Rotthier as its future Chief Executive Officer                                                                                                                                                         * The new company1 will be the largest API player in the European Union, with approximately €1 billion in expected sales by 2022 * Karl Rotthier joins Sanofi as EUROAPI Chief Executive Officer and further lead the creation of this new Europe-based industry champion * EUROAPI will help securing significant API manufacturing and supply capacities that are critical for patients in Europe and beyond * An IPO on Euronext Paris will be evaluated for 2022 - subject to market conditions  Paris – January 12th, 2021 \- Sanofi chooses EUROAPI as the name for the future leading European company dedicated to the development, production and marketing of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API).EUROAPI will represent the “made in Europe” API state-of-the-art industrial capabilities and technologies, with approximately €1 billion in expected sales by 2022. It will rank number 1 in small molecules API, and number 2 on the global API market2. Addressing recent increasing medicine shortages that critically impact patient care, EUROAPI will ensure additional API supply capacities for Europe and beyond, and help balancing the industry’s heavy reliance on API sourced from other regions.Sanofi also announces the appointment of Karl Rotthier as the EUROAPI future Chief Executive Officer, effective January 18th. Karl Rotthier, 53 years old, is a seasoned leader with a strong API business experience. He was most recently the Chief Executive Officer of Centrient Pharmaceuticals, and had the opportunity throughout his 29-years international career in the Netherands, Germany, Austria, Belgium and Singapore, to also drive operational carve-outs and spin-offs.Karl will lead the creation of EUROAPI together with the new company Management Team towards its growth ambitions. EUROAPI will employ 3,200 skilled employees and be headquartered in France. A planned IPO on Euronext Paris would be evaluated with a decision expected by 2022, subject to market conditions.   Philippe Luscan, Executive Vice President, Global Industrial Affairs at Sanofi, said: “We are very pleased today to unveil EUROAPI and welcome Karl to lead this future industry champion, as it gives further substance to our ambitious project. Sanofi is fully committed to the new company’s success, including by establishing a long-term customer relationship with EUROAPI and holding a minority stake of approximately 30% in it. To provide the optimal conditions for success, Sanofi intends the new company to be debt free in order to maximize its future investment capacities.”Karl Rotthier, future CEO of EUROAPI emphasizes: “I am particularly delighted to join EUROAPI and look forward to working with my colleagues in creating an agile, stand-alone company, able to unlock its growth potential in a market sustainably growing at a pace of 6% per year3. Building on a strong industrial legacy built over decades and broad expertise and experience, EUROAPI would help secure a greater stability in supplying quality drugs to millions of patients worldwide.”The project announced by Sanofi in February 2020, consists of creating a standalone company which will combine Sanofi’s API commercial and development activities with six of its European production sites: Brindisi (Italy), Frankfurt Chemistry (Germany), Haverhill (UK), St Aubin les Elbeuf (France), Újpest (Hungary) and Vertolaye (France). EUROAPI will have significant competitive strengths, including a broad portfolio of 200 APIs with both volume and niche products, high standards of quality and industrial means, competitive pricing and technologies across Europe, and will leverage an extensive commercial network covering more than 80 countries.*About Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API)Active pharmaceutical ingredients or APIs are the chemicals or biologicals which have a beneficial therapeutic effect in a medicine. These are the essential molecules used in the composition and the production of any drug.     About Sanofi   Sanofi is dedicated to supporting people through their health challenges. We are a global biopharmaceutical company focused on human health. We prevent illness with vaccines, provide innovative treatments to fight pain and ease suffering. We stand by the few who suffer from rare diseases and the millions with long-term chronic conditions.   With more than 100,000 people in 100 countries, Sanofi is transforming scientific innovation into healthcare solutions around the globe.   Sanofi, Empowering Life   Media Relations Contact Ashleigh Koss Tel: +1 (908) 981-8745 Ashleigh.Koss@sanofi.comQuentin Vivant Tel.: +33 (0)1 53 77 46 46 mr@sanofi.com Investor Relations Contacts Paris Eva Schaefer-Jansen Arnaud Delepine Yvonne Naughton   Investor Relations Contacts North America Felix Lauscher Fara Berkowitz Suzanne Greco   IR main line: Tel.: +33 (0)1 53 77 45 45 investor.relations@sanofi.com   https://www.sanofi.com/en/investors/contactForward-Looking Statements This press release contains forward-looking statements as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, as amended. Forward-looking statements are statements that are not historical facts. These statements include projections and estimates and their underlying assumptions, statements regarding plans, objectives, intentions and expectations with respect to future financial results, events, operations, services, product development and potential, and statements regarding future performance. Forward-looking statements are generally identified by the words “expects”, “anticipates”, “believes”, “intends”, “estimates”, “plans” and similar expressions. Although Sanofi’s management believes that the expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are reasonable, investors are cautioned that forward-looking information and statements are subject to various risks and uncertainties, many of which are difficult to predict and generally beyond the control of Sanofi, that could cause actual results and developments to differ materially from those expressed in, or implied or projected by, the forward-looking information and statements. These risks and uncertainties include among other things, the uncertainties inherent in research and development, future clinical data and analysis, including post marketing, decisions by regulatory authorities, such as the FDA or the EMA, regarding whether and when to approve any drug, device or biological application that may be filed for any such product candidates as well as their decisions regarding labelling and other matters that could affect the availability or commercial potential of such product candidates, the fact that product candidates if approved may not be commercially successful, the future approval and commercial success of therapeutic alternatives, Sanofi’s ability to benefit from external growth opportunities, to complete related transactions and/or obtain regulatory clearances, risks associated with intellectual property and any related pending or future litigation and the  ultimate outcome of such litigation,  trends in exchange rates and prevailing interest rates, volatile economic and market conditions, cost containment initiatives and subsequent changes thereto, and the impact that COVID-19 will have on us, our customers, suppliers, vendors, and other business partners, and the financial condition of any one of them, as well as on our employees and on the global economy as a whole.  Any material effect of COVID-19 on any of the foregoing could also adversely impact us. This situation is changing rapidly and additional impacts may arise of which we are not currently aware and may exacerbate other previously identified risks. The risks and uncertainties also include the uncertainties discussed or identified in the public filings with the SEC and the AMF made by Sanofi, including those listed under “Risk Factors” and “Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” in Sanofi’s annual report on Form 20-F for the year ended December 31, 2019. Other than as required by applicable law, Sanofi does not undertake any obligation to update or revise any forward-looking information or statements.* * *1 Subject to consultation with social partners and works councils 2 Source: company estimates based on comparison with data published in annual reports of major API companies 3 Source: Future growth estimate based on expert interviews and Technavio Report “Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients      Market by Manufacturing Type and Geography – Forecast and Analysis 2020-2024”, Dec. 2019   Attachment * Press release

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  • Biond Biologics and Sanofi Enter into Global Licensing Agreement for BND-22, a Novel Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Targeting the ILT2 Receptor

    Biond Biologics Ltd. ("Biond" or the "Company"), a privately-held biopharmaceutical company, developing novel immunotherapies for cancer and a platform enabling the intracellular delivery of biologics, today announced that it has entered into an exclusive worldwide license agreement with Sanofi (EURONEXT: SAN) (NASDAQ: SNY), for the development and commercialization of BND-22.

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  • 3 Coronavirus Stocks to Stay Miles Away From in 2021

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  • Sanofi (SNY) to Acquire Kymab to Boost Immunology Presence

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  • Sanofi to acquire Kymab, adding KY1005 to its pipeline, a human monoclonal antibody targeting key immune system regulator OX40L

    Sanofi to acquire Kymab, adding KY1005 to its pipeline, a human monoclonal antibody targeting key immune system regulator OX40L*Continues to build on Sanofi’s leading presence in immunology aligned with strategy to pursue best-in-class treatments in defined areasPARIS and CAMBRIDGE, UK – January 11, 2021 – Sanofi and Kymab, a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company developing fully human monoclonal antibodies with a focus on immune-mediated diseases and immuno-oncology therapeutics, have entered into an agreement under which Sanofi will acquire Kymab for an upfront payment of approximately $1.1 billion and up to $350 million upon achievement of certain milestones.The transaction will result in Sanofi having full global rights to KY1005, a fully human monoclonal antibody that has a novel mechanism of action. KY1005 binds to OX40-Ligand and has the potential to treat a wide variety of immune-mediated diseases and inflammatory disorders. “The Kymab acquisition adds KY1005 to our dynamic pipeline, a potential first-in-class treatment for a range of immune and inflammatory diseases. The novel mechanism of action may provide treatment for patients with suboptimal responses to available therapies,” said Paul Hudson, Sanofi Chief Executive Officer. “We understand from our ongoing work in debilitating immunological diseases how critical it is to find the right treatment for each patient. We look forward to rapidly developing this investigational medicine.”“The agreement is a testament to the commitment, drive and expertise of the entire Kymab team and we are pleased to receive this endorsement from Sanofi,” added Simon Sturge, Chief Executive Officer, Kymab. “With its significant global resources, we believe Sanofi is the perfect partner to progress Kymab’s pipeline of products and the merger will expedite the time it takes for our novel therapies to get to patients.”KY1005: Promising antibody for inflammatory disordersIn August 2020, Kymab announced that KY1005 met both primary endpoints in a Phase 2a trial studying moderate to severe atopic dermatitis patients whose disease is inadequately controlled with topical corticosteroids. KY1005 demonstrated a consistent treatment effect versus placebo across various key endpoints, including in the Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI) and additional objective clinical measures.“This acquisition aligns with our strategy of targeting fundamentally important disease pathways.  We believe that OX40L, a key immune regulator, has the potential to rebalance the immune system without suppressing it, providing a promising new approach to treating a range of immune-mediated diseases,” said John Reed, M.D. Ph.D., Global Head of Research & Development at Sanofi. Kymab’s pipeline also includes the oncology asset KY1044, an ICOS agonist monoclonal antibody, currently in early Phase 1/2 development as monotherapy and in combination with an anti-PD-L1. The acquisition also provides Sanofi with access to new antibody technologies and research capabilities. Transaction Terms Under the terms of the transaction, Sanofi will acquire Kymab for an upfront payment of approximately $1.1 billion and up to $350 million upon achievement of certain milestones.Sanofi plans to finance the transaction with cash on hand. The closing of the transaction is subject to the expiration or termination of the waiting period under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act of 1976 and other customary closing conditions. Sanofi expects to complete the acquisition in the first half of 2021.  Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP is acting as Sanofi’s legal counsel. J.P. Morgan is acting as financial advisor to Kymab and Goodwin PLC is acting as its legal counsel.About KymabKymab is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company developing fully human monoclonal antibody therapeutics with a focus on immune mediated diseases and immuno-oncology using its proprietary, integrated platforms collectively called IntelliSelect®. Kymab’s IntelliSelect Transgenic platforms contain a full diversity of human antibodies, making them the most comprehensive antibody platforms available. Selecting from a broad diversity of fully human antibodies assures the highest probability of finding drug candidates with best-in-class characteristics quickly and efficiently. For more information on Kymab please see http://www.kymab.com. Kymab and IntelliSelect are trademarks of Kymab Limited.   About Sanofi   Sanofi is dedicated to supporting people through their health challenges. We are a global biopharmaceutical company focused on human health. We prevent illness with vaccines, provide innovative treatments to fight pain and ease suffering. We stand by the few who suffer from rare diseases and the millions with long-term chronic conditions.   With more than 100,000 people in 100 countries, Sanofi is transforming scientific innovation into healthcare solutions around the globe.   Sanofi, Empowering Life   Sanofi Media Relations Contacts Ashleigh Koss Tel.: +1 (908) 205 2572 ashleigh.koss@sanofi.com   Quentin Vivant Tel.: +33 (0)1 53 77 46 46 mr@sanofi.com           Kymab Anne Hyland Anne.hyland@kymab.com   Brandon Lewis Brandon.lewis@kymab.com +44 (0) 1223 833 301     Sanofi Investor Relations Contacts Paris Eva Schaefer-Jansen Arnaud Delepine Yvonne Naughton   Sanofi Investor Relations Contacts North America Felix Lauscher Fara Berkowitz Suzanne Greco   IR main line: Tel.: +33 (0)1 53 77 45 45 ir@sanofi.com     Kymab Media UK Consilium Strategic Communications Mary-Jane Elliott / Sukaina Virji / Melissa Gardiner kymab@consilium-comms.com Tel: +44 (0) 20 3709 5700     Sanofi Forward-Looking Statements This press release contains forward-looking statements as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, as amended.  Forward-looking statements are statements that are not historical facts and may include projections and estimates and their underlying assumptions, statements regarding plans, objectives, intentions and expectations with respect to future financial results, events, operations, services, product development and potential, and statements regarding future performance. Forward-looking statements are generally identified by the words “expects”, “anticipates”, “believes”, “intends”, “estimates”, “plans”, “will be” and similar expressions. Although Sanofi’s management believes that the expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are reasonable, investors are cautioned that forward-looking information and statements are subject to various risks and uncertainties, many of which are difficult to predict and generally beyond the control of Sanofi, that could cause actual results and developments to differ materially from those expressed in, or implied or projected by, the forward-looking information and statements. These risks and uncertainties include among other things, risks related to Sanofi’s ability to complete the acquisition on the proposed terms or on the proposed timeline, including the receipt of required regulatory approvals, other risks associated with executing business combination transactions, such as the risk that the businesses will not be integrated successfully, that such integration may be more difficult, time-consuming or costly than expected or that the expected benefits of the acquisition will not be realized including the ability to develop, commercialize or market new products, competition, the uncertainties inherent in research and development, including future clinical data and analysis, regulatory obligations and oversight by regulatory authorities, such as the FDA or the EMA, including decisions of such authorities regarding whether and when to approve any drug, device or biological application that may be filed for any product candidates as well as decisions regarding labelling and other matters that could affect the availability or commercial potential of any product candidates, the absence of a guarantee that any product candidates, if approved, will be commercially successful, the future approval and commercial success of therapeutic alternatives, Sanofi’s ability to benefit from external growth opportunities and to complete related transactions and/or obtain regulatory clearances, risks associated with Sanofi’s and Kymab’s intellectual property and any related pending or future litigation and the ultimate outcome of such litigation, trends in exchange rates and prevailing interest rates, volatile economic and market conditions, cost containment initiatives and subsequent changes thereto, and the impact that COVID-19 will have on Sanofi and Kymab and their respective customers, suppliers, vendors, and other business partners, and the financial condition of any one of them, as well as on Sanofi’s and Kymab’s employees and on the global economy as a whole.  Any material effect of COVID-19 on any of the foregoing could also adversely impact Sanofi and Kymab. This situation is changing rapidly and additional impacts may arise of which Sanofi and Kymab are not currently aware and may exacerbate other previously identified risks. While the list of factors presented here is representative, no list should be considered a statement of all potential risks, uncertainties or assumptions that could have a material adverse effect on Sanofi’s consolidated financial condition or results of operations.  The foregoing factors should be read in conjunction with the risks and cautionary statements discussed or identified in the public filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) and AMF made by Sanofi, including those listed under “Risk Factors” and “Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” in Sanofi’s annual report on Form 20-F for the year ended December 31, 2019 and in subsequent Form 6-Ks filed with the SEC.  The forward-looking statements speak only as of the date hereof and, other than as required by applicable law, Sanofi does not undertake any obligation to update or revise any forward-looking information or statements.   Attachment * Press Release

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  • Would You Take Russia's Covid-19 Vaccine?

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- When it comes to Covid-19 vaccines, a lot of attention seems to have centered on the ones being made in the West. So it may come as a surprise that Russia is fifth on the list of vaccine makers with the most doses under contract through pre-purchase agreements, according to Bloomberg’s Covid-19 Vaccine Tracker. The shot — whimsically named Sputnik V and developed by the Gamaleya institute — is just behind GlaxoSmithKline Plc and Sanofi’s candidate in the rankings and ahead of the shots developed by Moderna Inc. and Johnson & Johnson. This is notable for a vaccine that has yet to be featured in any peer-reviewed scientific journal. How do we know we can trust it?Russia hasn’t released late-stage phase III data on its vaccine; all we have to go on are press announcements, similar to the situation with the Chinese shot made by Sinovac Biotech Ltd. The assumption is that regional health authorities have approved the Russian vaccine based on good efficacy and safety data, but there is no way of independently verifying these things without actually seeing it ourselves. That said, what we do know about Sputnik V and its design should give us some degree of confidence.What’s known: The Sputnik V has been tested in a phase III trial involving 22,714 subjects, with three interim analyses when the number of confirmed cases reached 20, 39 and 78, respectively. While the final number of cases is lower than that in the Moderna and Pfizer Inc.-BioNTech SE vaccine trials, those were larger and conducted in the U.S., where the infection rates were rising rapidly. Efficacy at each interim analysis in the Sputnik V trial was consistently at 90% or above, based on comments in press releases. There were also no cases of severe Covid-19 in vaccinated individuals, though definitions of disease severity are not clear.As for its design, Sputnik V was developed using the kind of advanced vaccine technology employed in shots made by the AstraZeneca-Oxford University partnership and Johnson & Johnson. These two-dose vaccines use adenoviral vectors -- viruses based on the cause of the common cold that are engineered to deliver the genetic material coding for the Sars-Cov-2’s key “spike” protein, which in turn prompts the immune system to mount a response to protect against further infections.Sputnik V has one key, clever difference from the Astra and J&J vaccines: It uses the same adenovirus as J&J for the first dose (adenovirus-26) and a different adenovirus (adenovirus-5) for the second dose. In this way, it avoids the possibility of immunity to the first dose impacting the ability of the second dose to work efficiently. One issue is that a large percentage of people have pre-existing immunity to adenovirus-5, but that’s not a huge drawback if the efficacy is very high. A potentially more promising alternative would be to try a combination of adenovirus-26 for the first shot and Astra’s adenoviral vector – made from a chimp adenovirus – for the second, which is exactly what the two groups have agreed to do in a collaboration announced on Dec.11. Taken together, these details – even without the phase III results – give me reason to think the Sputnik V vaccine may well be as strong a candidate as the ones created in Western labs. The same can’t be said for Sinovac’s shot, CoronaVac, which is undergoing trials in Turkey, Brazil and Indonesia.Phase III efficacy data for the CoronaVac shot has been all over the place – from 50% to more than 90% - with different numbers coming from different authorities in recent weeks. On Thursday, a Brazilian newspaper reported efficacy for the shot of 78%, adding to the confusion. This opacity does not help confidence in the vaccine. Then there is the question of the technology base. CoronaVac uses killed virus in its vaccine, mixed with a traditional adjuvant called alum. It’s similar to the shot in development by French biotech firm Valneva SE, though the latter uses a potentially more powerful adjuvant from its partnership with California-based Dynavax Technologies Corp. While both may have the theoretical advantage of inducing an immune response to other parts of the virus than just the spike protein, which is the target of most other vaccines, the choice of an old adjuvant for the Sinovac shot is not great.At some point, I hope soon, the phase III data for the Sputnik V and CoronaVac vaccines will be published in a peer-reviewed journal so that we can make up our own minds about the robustness of their efficacy and safety. As of now, though — and based on what I know so far — if I had to choose between the two, I would opt for a ride on Sputnik rather than a trip to CoronaVac’s golden stars.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Sam Fazeli is senior pharmaceuticals analyst for Bloomberg Intelligence and director of research for EMEA. For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2021 Bloomberg L.P.

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  • Roche, Sanofi arthritis drugs reduce death rates among sickest COVID-19 patients 

    Treating critically ill COVID-19 patients with Roche's Actemra or Sanofi's Kevzara arthritis drugs significantly improves survival rates and reduces the amount of time patients need intensive care, study results showed on Thursday. The findings, which have not yet been peer-reviewed, showed that the immunosuppressive drugs - Actemra, also known as tocilizumab, and Kevzara, also known as sarilumab - reduced death rates by 8.5 percentage points among patients hospitalised and severely ill with the pandemic disease.

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  • Europe Is Botching the Vaccine Rollout

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- European countries have long prided themselves on their strong welfare states, including public-health systems. They are also convinced that the state has a big role to play in fostering the recovery after the pandemic.The painfully slow rollout of Covid-19 vaccines across the European Union is undermining any claims that government knows best, whether at a national or supranational level. Unless Europe gets its mass inoculation programs right, quickly, it will be hard to believe that its political model can deliver better results to its citizens than what’s available in the rest of the world.Europe hasn’t exactly covered itself in glory during the pandemic. The continent suffered a brutal first wave in the spring, as the new coronavirus revealed gaping holes in the health-care sectors of many countries such as Italy and Spain. During the summer, the EU appeared to cope better than the U.S., spurring hopes that it had developed effective track-and-trace systems that could help avoid new lockdowns. However, a second wave of Covid-19 during the autumn dashed any claims of European superiority. Only some countries in Asia, as well as Australia and New Zealand, have managed the pandemic competently.Unfortunately, the EU also seems to be botching the latest, and perhaps most important, stage of virus management: mass inoculation. The European Medical Agency is taking its time to approve vaccines that have been deemed viable elsewhere. Its delay on the joint effort from AstraZeneca Plc and the University of Oxford is understandable: The trial of this jab has been marred by problems that justify a more cautious approach than the U.K.’s speedy approval. However, the slow study of the Pfizer Inc.-BioNTech SE vaccine and the one from Moderna Inc. (still waiting for the green light) is much harder to understand.The vaccine’s rollout has been even worse. Germany, France, Italy and Spain — the EU’s largest countries — have together inoculated less than half the number of people who’ve received a jab in Israel, according to data compiled by Bloomberg News. This is despite those four EU nations having nearly 30 times Israel’s population.Germany’s effort has been much speedier than other EU states, and Italy is at least providing a dashboard to show its progress. But Spain’s communication has been less forthcoming, and France could only manage an embarrassing 516 jabs in the first week of the program. While the EMA delays and the Christmas holidays didn’t help, there are few signs that the continent is catching up quickly as it struggles with bureaucracy, a scarcity of trained medical personnel and equipment.Europe can claim some successes. The first authorized vaccine was developed in a German lab, even though it took a U.S. company to scale it up. However, even in research and development there have been notable fiascos, including the vaccine efforts of France’s Sanofi, which have been pushed back until the end of 2021 at the earliest.The European Commission may have failed to spot which vaccines looked most promising as it placed its orders this summer. It is having to belatedly increase its orders of the BioNTech-Pzifer and Moderna jabs, two treatments on which the Americans had bet earlier.The case for speedy vaccination is so overwhelming that one wonders why Europe is dithering. An effective and fast mass-inoculation program will save thousands of lives, allow countries to reopen their economies sooner and avoid the psychological pain of endless lockdowns. It can also limit the risk of mutations such as the so-called “U.K. variant,” which can make the Sars-CoV-2 virus a lot harder to control.Even the presence of production bottlenecks doesn’t justify the lax approach: It makes sense to just use whatever you have available to immunize as many people as possible, instead of leaving doses sitting idly in a fridge while a government pulls together its distribution plans.This effort isn’t easy. Politicians may need to train more medical staff, open up special venues and win over those who fear that these vaccines haven’t been tested adequately. But these tasks should have begun in earnest months ago, as soon as it became clear that one or more effective vaccines was likely.With the emergence of seemingly more virulent forms of Covid and the approval of vaccines with which to fight them, there are no excuses for dallying now. Europe must inject some needed dynamism into its vaccination efforts. Its reputation for competent government — and for its prized social model — hinges on what it will show its citizens and the world.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Ferdinando Giugliano writes columns on European economics for Bloomberg Opinion. He is also an economics columnist for La Repubblica and was a member of the editorial board of the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2021 Bloomberg L.P.

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  • Sanofi: Information concerning the total number of voting rights and shares - November 2020

    Information concerning the total number of voting rights and shares, provided pursuant to article L. 233-8 II of the Code de commerce (the French Commercial Code) and article 223-16 of the Règlement général de l’Autorité des Marchés Financiers (Regulation of the French stock market authority)Sanofi a French société anonyme with a registered share capital of 2,517,873,886 € Registered office : 54, rue La Boétie – 75008 Paris – France Registered at the Paris Commercial and Companies Registry under number 395 030 844Date   Total number of issued shares   Number of real voting rights (excluding treasury shares) Theoretical number of voting rights (including treasury shares)* November 30, 2020 1,258,964,700 1,411,103,526 1,413,699,285 *  Pursuant to article 223-11 of the Règlement général de l’Autorité des Marchés Financiers.This information is also available on the internet website of sanofi under « Regulated Information in France »:https://www.sanofi.com/en/investors/sanofi-share-and-adrs/share-overview/shares-and-voting-rights/Investor Relations Department Europe Tel: + 33 1 53 77 45 45           US Tel: + 1 908 981 5560 e-mail: investor.relations@sanofi.com   Media Relations Department Tel: + 33 1 53 77 46 46  e-mail: MR@sanofi.com    Attachment * EN_number_of_shares_and_voting_rights_November_2020

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  • Here's What Investors Need to Know About Sanofi and GlaxoSmithKline's COVID Vaccine Setback

    Sanofi (NASDAQ: SNY) and GlaxoSmithKline (NYSE: GSK) hit a bit of a speed bump with their coronavirus vaccine, which didn't produce a robust immune response in clinical trial participants 50 and older. In this video from Motley Fool Live, recorded on Dec. 14, Corinne Cardina, bureau chief of healthcare and cannabis for Fool.com, and Fool.com contributor Brian Orelli discuss the data and how the vaccine differs from the currently authorized vaccines.

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  • European Union Approves Pfizer-BioNTech Covid Vaccine. What Comes Next.

    “It is a significant step forward in our fight against the pandemic,” said Emer Cooke, the executive director of the European Medicines Agency, “not just for Europe but all over the world.” As after the vaccine’s emergency authorization in the U.S., Pfizer stock (ticker: PFE) sold off. In early trading Monday, Pfizer was down 2%, to 37.

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  • What Went Wrong With the Covid-19 Vaccine Trials

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- If there’s a common theme in the errors of the U.S. response to Covid-19, it’s been the astounding amount of squandering. Our leaders squandered time, as well as public trust and people’s economic and emotional resources. And they squandered the chance to do good science — testing drugs and vaccines in a way that serves the public interest rather than the interest of pharmaceutical companies.There’s no question that Covid-19 vaccines and therapies will save many lives. But we’re not doing the kinds of scientific studies needed to determine the best vaccines and therapies to maximize lives saved and minimize the weeks we endure unprecedented social and economic constraints. It’s not too late to change course.It’s not too late, for example to test the possibility some have raised that the return to normal could be advanced by months if the Pfizer vaccine is given as a single shot. Though clinical trials determined safety and efficacy for two shots, supplies are running short and there’s some evidence that one shot provides some protection.The company could test the idea by picking a group of volunteers in the early rollout to get one shot, and compare them with those getting two, says Peter Bach, a physician and director of the drug pricing lab at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. A trial would be the only way to justify giving people a single shot.He says he also stands by a recommendation he made in September, that vaccines be tested against one another. There’s much valuable data that could be gathered quickly given that there are more than 40 vaccines in the testing stage, with many different technological approaches. Some use inactive virus, others pieces of the virus and still others viral DNA encased in various kinds of harmless viruses. Then there are the two front runners, which use messenger RNA.As researchers told me last spring, some of these vaccines might be better at preventing high risk people from getting fatal cases, while others might be better for keeping lower-risk individuals from spreading the virus. Some will be cheaper and easier to manufacture. Some will induce fewer side effects. Pfizer’s product requires extreme refrigeration; others don’t.  One candidate might even work as an oral vaccine rather than an injection.The first vaccines across the finish line of FDA authorization might not be the best ones for achieving worldwide immunity. As STATnews reported in September, several of the “tortoises” in the race, from Merck and Sanofi, look very strong.“You don’t lose anything if you do fifty thousand people with Pfizer versus J&J,” says Bach. “It’s not like you’re squandering the Pfizer vaccines.” Such tests would be in the public interest, ensuring we get the maximum amount of data in a minimum of time.The way clinical trials usually work, companies design their own trials within some constraints established by regulators like the FDA. But it doesn’t have to be that way. In this unprecedented situation, we should have a much more uniform standard for scientific testing. In fact, last June, the FDA did lay out some standard experimental guidelines for vaccine manufacturers, says Bach. “That was completely ignored.”A mandatory standard might have given us much-needed information on how well those newly approved Pfizer and Moderna vaccines protect against asymptomatic infection and thereby help us all achieve herd immunity. Testing subjects regularly for Covid-19 would have told us this, but Pfizer and Moderna didn’t collect that data. The AstraZeneca trial did collect data on asymptomatic cases, though the trial was marred by a serious mistake with dosing. And contact tracing subjects might even help us learn if vaccinated people can transmit silent infections to others. Those are not normal procedures, but this is not a normal situation.The other looming mystery is how long vaccine-induced immunity lasts. The best way to learn about longer-term safety and efficacy is to keep the placebo-controlled trials going. But Pfizer is already talking about ending its trial by giving the people in the control arm the vaccine. The gesture may seem altruistic, but there’s a selfish side to it: It undercuts the ability to keep getting data and uncover less common safety issues.The same idea applies to drug that could treat Covid-19, which should be tested in a standardized system designed for our benefit. Last spring, the antiviral drug Remdesivir was approved, for example, with minimal data on efficacy, timing and dosing. It’s proven disappointing.The public is so worn down that we’re grateful for any ray of hope, and disinclined to question something that would end the pandemic — even though pharmaceutical companies are getting a great bargain out of this. They deserve some praise, but not as much as the public deserves the best possible public health campaign. That hasn’t been the standard in 2020, but it’s not too late to do better.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Faye Flam is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. She has written for the Economist, the New York Times, the Washington Post, Psychology Today, Science and other publications. She has a degree in geophysics from the California Institute of Technology.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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  • Is SNY A Good Stock To Buy Now?

    While the market driven by short-term sentiment influenced by the accommodative interest rate environment in the US, virus news and stimulus talks, many smart money investors are starting to get cautious towards the current bull run since March and hedging or reducing many of their long positions. Some fund managers are betting on Dow hitting […]

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