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Answer your questions that you are wondering by reading our carefully reviewed blog post with examples of what quantitative do and the skills and training needed.

 

Table of Contents

Important Notes 

What Do Quant Traders Do?

Technical Skills

Soft Skills

Conclusion

 

Profitable salaries, high bonuses, and creativity on the job have made quantitative trading an advantageous career option. Quantitative traders use mathematical models to identify trading opportunities and buy and sell securities. The influx of candidates from academia, software development, and engineering fields has made the field highly competitive. In today's article, we'll touch on what quantitative do and the skills and training needed.

 

Important Notes 

  • Quant traders use strategies that rely on quantitative analysis to find trading opportunities that could include hundreds of thousands of securities.
  • An aspiring quantitative trader needs to be extremely skilled and interested in all things mathematical.
  • A bachelor's degree in mathematics, a master's degree in financial engineering or quantitative financial modeling, or an MBA are all eligible to score a job. Some analysts will also have doctoral degrees.
  • The candidate without an advanced degree is expected to have at least on-the-job training and experience as a data analyst. Experience with data mining, research, analysis, and automated trading systems is a must.
  • Also, traders need soft skills such as succeeding under pressure, staying focused despite long hours, withstanding an aggressive environment, and failures in pursuit of success.

 

What Do Quant Traders Do?

The word "Quantum" is derived from the word quantitative meaning to work with bears. The advancement of computer-assisted algorithmic trading and high-frequency trading means that there is a huge amount of data that needs to be analyzed. Quants researches and researches available price and price data identify profitable trading opportunities, develops relevant trading strategies and exploits lightning-fast opportunities using self-developed computer programs. In essence, some trader needs a balanced mix of in-depth math knowledge, practical trading exposure, and computer skills.

 

Technical Skills

An aspiring quantitative requires at least a background in finance, mathematics, and computer programming. In addition, quants must have the following skills and background:

 

  • Numbers: Quant traders must be very good at math and quantitative analysis. For example, if terms like conditional probability, skewness, kurtosis, and VaR sound unfamiliar, then you're probably not fit to be a quantifier. In-depth mathematical knowledge is required to research data, test results, and implement established trading strategies. Defined trading strategies, applied algorithms, and trading execution methods should be as seamless as possible. In today's lightning-fast trading world, trading algorithms crunching with complex numbers occupy the majority of the market share. Even a small mistake in the underlying concept on the part of the quantitative trader can result in a huge trading loss.

 

  • Education and Training: Recent college graduates have a hard time finding a job as some trader. A more typical career path is to start as a data research analyst and become a quant after a few years. Education such as a master's degree in financial engineering, a diploma in quantitative financial modeling, or electives in quantitative streams during the regular MBA can give candidates a head start. These courses cover theoretical concepts and practical introductions to the tools needed for volume trading.

 

 

  • Trading Concepts: Quants are expected to discover and design their unique trading strategies and models from scratch and customize established models. Some trading candidates should have a detailed knowledge of popular trading strategies as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each.

 

  • Programming Skills: Quant traders should be familiar with data mining, research, analysis, and automated trading systems. They are usually engaged in high-frequency trading or algorithmic trading. A good understanding of at least one programming language is essential, and the more programming the candidate knows, the better. E.g; C++, Java, Python, and Perl are a few commonly used programming languages. Familiarity with tools like MATLAB and spreadsheets and concepts like big data and data structuring is a plus.

 

  • Computer Usage: Quants applies its algorithms to real-time data including prices and offers. They should be familiar with data feeds and related systems such as the Bloomberg terminal that provides content. They should also be comfortable with charting and analyzing software applications and spreadsheets and be able to use broker trading platforms to place orders.

 

Soft Skills

Apart from the technical skills we mentioned, quantitative traders also need soft skills. From time to time, those working at investment banks or hedge funds may be required to submit concepts they have developed to fund managers and senior executives for approval. Quants do not typically interact with customers and often work with a team of experts. So average communication skills may suffice. In addition, he should have the following soft skills:

  • The temperament of a trader: To be honest, not everyone can think and act like a trader. Successful traders are always looking for innovative trading ideas, can adapt to changing market conditions, thrive under stress, and accept long working hours. Employers thoroughly evaluate candidates for these characteristics. Some are even subjected to psychometric tests.
  • Risk-taking abilities: Today's business world is for the brave. With computer addiction and margin and leveraged trading, losses can reach higher than a trader's available capital. Enthusiastic quants must understand risk management and risk mitigation techniques. A successful amount can make 10 trades, face losses in the top eight, and profit from only the last two trades.
  • Comfortable with failure: One keeps searching for quantitative, innovative trading ideas. Even if an idea seems perfect, dynamic market conditions can bankrupt it. Many enthusiastic volume traders fail because they get stuck on an idea and keep running it despite hostile market conditions. They may have a hard time accepting failure and therefore do not want to give up their concept. On the other hand, successful quantities follow a dynamic separation approach and quickly move to other models and concepts as soon as they find difficulties in existing models.
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Conclusion 

Quant trading requires advanced skills in finance, mathematics, and computer programming. Big salaries and skyrocketing bonuses attract many candidates, so getting the first job can be difficult. Beyond that, continuous success requires constant innovation, convenience with risk, and long working hours. We hope that this blog post will be beneficial for you. We will continue to create useful works to get inspired by everyone. We are sure that we will achieve splendid things altogether. Keep on following Finage for the best and more.


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